Kyujanggak images

History

Kyujanggak
The historic origins of Seoul National University Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies trace as far back Kyujanggak, the Royal Research Library and Institute of the late Joseon Dynasty that existed during the late Joseon Dynasty.
Kyujanggak was established as an official national institute immediately following the 1776 accession of King Jeongjo as the 22-nd king of the dynasty It was originally conceived as a royal library dedicated to the preservation of the writings and calligraphy produced by Joseon Dynasty kings, as well as a repository for the royal genealogy.
It also performed additional functions, such as acting as an advisory organ in which civil officials engaged in studies so as to be able to offer counsel to the king, as an archive of domestic and foreign precedents that functioned as a reference center for state administration, and as a stationery office for publishing books.
Today, the collection at Seoul National University Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies includes seven different types of texts, numbering 7,125 documents in total. These include national treasures, such as the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, and twenty-six types of treasures (comprising 166 individual treasures), as well as four relics that are listed under UNESCO’s Memory of the World register. Furthermore, the institute engages in various activities such as research, publishing, exhibitions, education, and international exchange, based on the preservation and management of Kyujanggak materials.
Joseon Dynasty
1776 (the year of King Jeongjo’s accession)
- King Jeongjo orders the establishment of Kyujanggak.
- Juhapru is constructed in Changdeok Palace and is used as the building for Kyujanggak.

1777 (1st Year of King Jeongjo’s Reign)
- The Office of the Editorial Review (Gyoseogwan) is annexed to Kyujanggak.

1781 (5th Year of King Jeongjo’s Reign)
- The framed nameplate bearing the calligraphy “Kyujanggak,” written by King Sukjong, is moved to Juhapru.
- A (special education system for select -officials) (chogye munsin) is established at Kyujanggak.

1782 (6th Year of King Jeongjo’s Reign)
- Kyujanggak Annex on Ganghwa Island is established.

1784 (8th Year of King Jeongjo’s Reign)
- The Kyujanggakji, a document detailing the history, system, and regulations of Kyujanggak, is published.

1866 (3rd Year of King Gojong’s Reign)
- The (French invasion of Korea in 1866 known as byeongin yangyo) occurs. French troops destroy the Kyujanggak Annex and remove various texts, including the Euigwe (the Royal Protocols of the Joseon Dynasty).

1908 (2nd Year of Emperor Yungheui’s Reign)
The texts contained in the archives of Mt. Jeongjok, Mt. Taebaek, Mt. Odae, and Mt. Jeoksang are moved to Kyujanggak.
Japanese Colonial Period
August 1910
Kyujanggak is dissolved. The colonial office governing Korean royalty (yiwangjik) is put in charge of managing the Kyujanggak texts.

February 1911
Kyujanggak texts are moved to the office of the Japanese Governor General of Korea, which then assumed control of managing the Kyujanggak texts.

1928-1930
Kyujanggak texts are moved to the library annexed to Gyeongseong Imperial University.
Kyujanggak of Seoul National University
1946
Seoul National University opens.
The central library of Seoul National University is charged with managing the Kyujanggak texts.

1962
The ‘Kyujanggak Texts Committee’ is established as an, annex to the central library of Seoul National University.

1975
The Kyujanggak texts are moved to the Gwanak campus of Seoul National University. The central library is expanded and reorganized into the ‘Seoul National University Library’, with the ‘Kyujanggak Texts Administrative Office’ established within the library.

1989
Construction of a new Kyujanggak building is completed, and operational testing commences.

1990
The Kyujanggak texts are moved to the new building.

1992
Due to a revision of the Decree on the Establishment of Seoul National University, the ‘Kyujanggak Texts Administrative Office’ is separated from the library and becomes independent as the ‘Kyujanggak of Seoul National University’.

April 2005
The Kyujanggak building undergoes expansion.
Seoul National University Korean Culture Research Center
1969
The Korean Culture Research Center of Seoul National University is founded as an annex of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

1976
The Korean Culture Research Center becomes an institution attached to the College of Humanities.

1979
Under Presidential Decree No. 9535, the Korean Culture Research Center is ordained by law as an official research institute and directly annexed to Seoul National University.

1980
Publication of the academic journal, ‘Hanguk Munhwa (Korean Culture)’ begins.

1988
The first stage of the Korean Studies Project by Seoul National University (1988-1992) begins. Publication of the English-language academic journal ‘The Seoul Journal of Korean Studies’, begins.

1993
The second stage of the Korean Studies Project by Seoul National University (1993-1998) begins.

1999
The center is selected for the “Central Research Institution Support Initiative” of the Korean Research Foundation.

2000
The center is selected for the “Humanities Support Initiative” of the Korean Research Foundation.

2003
The center is selected as the administrative body for the “Korean Studies Long-term Archive Research Program” of Seoul National University.
Seoul National University Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies
February 2006
Kyujanggak and the Korean Culture Research Center are merged to become the Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies.

August 2006
Jaha School (Jaha Seodang) is merged into the Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies.

November 2007
The International Center for Korean Studies is established.